Teaching Schools Council

“We want a system in which all children and young people achieve, regardless of their needs, background or perceived intelligence.”

The Teaching Schools Council (TSC) is a national body representing all Teaching Schools in England. The Council is made up of 20 members with either a national or regional remit, who direct and shape the work of Teaching Schools through discussion with government ministers and senior officials.

As an elected group of Representatives, the Teaching Schools Council exists to provide:

  • A regulator role: making recommendations about the designation of Teaching Schools.
  • A facilitator role: connecting Teaching School Alliances to each other.
  • An advisor role: advising the Secretary of State on a range of policy areas.

We come together as a representative group four times a year with a range of colleagues within the Department for Education to help shape a range of policy areas including the direction of travel for the self-improving school system.

The self-improving school system

We want a system in which every child is entitled to be in a great school.

Teaching Schools are at the heart of the country’s self-improving school system. The central premise of a self-improving system is that deep and sustained reform of our education system will not come from outside the profession. England has one of the most autonomous education systems in the world. Schools are collectively involved in placing the professionalism of school leaders at the very heart of the system.

Teaching Schools and their alliances are key enablers of improvement. They bring additional capacity to support the school leader to execute their improvement strategy more effectively in their school or trust.

Getting system governance right

Teaching Schools Council in partnership with FASNA, supported by Browne Jacobson

A think piece that aims to give an interpretation of where we are now, using this as a spring-board to look ahead with optimism and some clarity to where we could be. We offer it as an honest contribution to the direction of travel for the school-led system, a system and idea to which we are passionately committed


In ten or twenty years’ time, when children and young people look back at their schooling on our watch, we want them to say that they had a great education. This will be more likely if school leaders, stakeholders and policy makers today recognise the part they must play, and then work together to make it a reality